Challenging the stereotypes in recent British films.

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This topic contains 2 replies, has 3 voices, and was last updated by  adela1102 1 year, 8 months ago.

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    As a young filmmaker raised in East London I am constantly disheartened by the depictions of where I grew up and the lower social classes. It seems that while David Cameron suggests the British film industry should encourage more Hollywood style blockbusters for box office growth, the parallel trend has been to further demonise the lower classes to attract audiences to the cinemas. Both of these avenues restrict innovation and to quote Sally Potter in a recent article from the Independent newspaper “reduce the film industry to a stale business model”. To a young filmmaker from London, films which have received abundant funding and backing such as Attack the Block (2011), Kidulthood (2006), Adulthood (2008), Shank (2010) and Plan B’s upcoming feature ill Manors, to name but a few, only serve the purpose of confirming stereotypes, restricting artistic ability and discourage potential filmmakers who would like to tell another side of the story.

    Article mentioned featuring quote from Sally Potter:
    http://www.independent.co.uk/arts-entertainment/films/news/film-world-hits-back-over-pms-call-to-focus-on-blockbusters-6288354.html

    #1725 Reply

    crackstevens

    Whilst I totally agree with the sentiments of your argument I also in the same vain disagree with the statement “only serve the purpose of confirming stereotypes, restricting artistic ability and discourage potential filmmakers who would like to tell another side of the story” I think that as a film maker myself, if you are not making that other side of the story you are actively allowing yourself to become part of that machine.

    There are really no restrictions to making a film. I say this out of experience as I have never been given a budget or sort after one to make a film nor should I. I speak to host of film makers who stop at the first hurdle saying that they dont have money to make a film. Therefore are more likely to write something that would be more commercially viable like one of the films mentioned above. Either way I digress. I think that these films to beging with are made by young British film makers, as a stop gap to getting themselves known. A career is not leveled on one film and they should be defined over the course of their careers.

    Yes, the here and now is very negative but my darling Stella that is reflective of what the general public think of the underclasses (for right or wrong – it’s how we/they are portrayed in all aspects of media/ it’s how some (the minority) want to be portrayed). I’m not saying it is right but to really change anything a channel of discourse must first be established. I’m not a fan of any of the films made above for the exact reasons you mentioned but at the same time I am proud of the individuals who made those films and are encouraging others through them. What about the “Inbetweeners movie”? For example or “Attack the block”.

    In my opinion the battle is lost when (forgive me I’m not targeting this at you) we as a generation or group of artist start looking at avenues of blame rather than going out and being the changes we wish to see. The government doesn’t care, the money men won’t care, our friends often wont care and neither will our peers. Until we make them care by showcasing the other side to the argument. If we care enough about these issues we should really take a look at ourselves first, develop our ideas to the pinnacle of being creative without thinking of monetary constraints and create.

    #2880 Reply

    adela1102
    Member

    This is very useful for me.Can you share with us something more like this. Thanks.

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